The real science behind the unreal predictions of major earthquakes in 2018

The real science behind the unreal predictions of major earthquakes in 2018

Travel
[ad_1] SARAH KAPLAN Last updated 18:54, November 22 2017 Rebecca Bendick would like you to not panic.The University of Montana geophysicist knows you may have read the articles warning about "swarms of devastating earthquakes" that will allegedly rock the planet next year thanks to a slowdown of the Earth's rotation.And she feels "very awful" if you've been alarmed. Those dire threats are based on Bendick's research into patterns that might predict earthquakes - but claims of an impending "earthquake boom" are mostly sensationalism. IVAN ROMANO Rescuers dig through the rubble during a search for two missing children in Casamicciola Terme, Italy, after a magnitude-4.0 earthquake struck in August. Here is what the science actually says.READ MORE:* More big earthquakes in 2018 as Earth slows slightly* How Earth's rotation speed might affect earthquakes* Strong earthquake…
Read More
Biological Heritage National Science Challenge statement

Biological Heritage National Science Challenge statement

Tech
[ad_1] Thursday, 16 November 2017, 7:27 pmPress Release: Biological Heritage National Science Challenge Press release from the NZ’s Biological Heritage National Science ChallengeThe New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge welcomes public discussion on science-based options for tackling New Zealand’s biodiversity challenges, including the perspective piece by Professors Kevin Esvelt and Neil Gemmell discussing gene-drive technology for application to achieve Predator Free 2050.This Science Challenge was established to tackle the biggest threats to New Zealand’s environment. Small mammal predators are one of the biggest threats to New Zealand’s biodiversity, and our approach has always been to explore novel solutions to scale up pest control. A large amount of research effort is being harnessed via our 17 Challenge parties, including scientists in all 8 universities and 7 Crown Research Institutes.Via the…
Read More
Geologist Nick Mortimer Honoured by National Science Body

Geologist Nick Mortimer Honoured by National Science Body

Tech
[ad_1] Thursday, 16 November 2017, 8:23 amPress Release: GNS Science Geologist Honoured by National Science BodyA geologist who led a project that unveiled a new and largely underwater continent called Zealandia has been made a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand Te Apārangi.Nick Mortimer is a geologist and Principal Scientist at GNS Science and leads the organisation’s minerals programme. His most high-profile work was leading a project that revealed the largely submerged continent of Zealandia – a 4.9 million square kilometre continent on which New Zealand sits. While it lacks ‘official recognition’ as a continent, Zealandia meets all the criteria applied to the Earth’s other seven continents. When Dr Mortimer’s summary paper on Zealandia was published in a US science journal in February 2017, it generated unprecedented worldwide…
Read More
Starwatch: First interstellar visitor’s name is nod to Hawaiian sighting | Science

Starwatch: First interstellar visitor’s name is nod to Hawaiian sighting | Science

Tech
[ad_1] Path of 1I/’Oumuamua Astronomers finally have a name for the first known object from interstellar space to visit our solar system. The International Astronomical Union announced last week that it is to be called 1I/‘Oumuamua where “1I” designates it as the first interstellar object and ‘Oumuamua is a Hawaiian word that is said to reflect the way that this is akin to a scout or messenger reaching out to us from the past. The name was chosen by the astronomers who used the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii to discover the dim visitor on 18 October. It had already swept through perihelion within 38m km of the Sun on the 9th and 24m km from the Earth on the 14th. Its path is shown on our diagram where it…
Read More
Scientists discover ring around dwarf planet Haumea beyond Neptune | Science

Scientists discover ring around dwarf planet Haumea beyond Neptune | Science

Tech
[ad_1] A ring has been discovered around one of the dwarf planets that orbits the outer reaches of the solar system. Until now, ring-like structures had only been found around the four outer planets – Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. “In 2014 we discovered that a very small body in the Centaurs region [an area of small celestial bodies between the asteroid belt and Neptune] had a ring and at that time it seemed to be a very weird thing,” explained Dr José Ortiz, whose group at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía in Granada made the discovery described in the journal Nature. “We didn’t expect to find a ring around Haumea, but we were not too surprised either.” Thousands of so-called Neptunian objects are located in the outer solar…
Read More
House-sized asteroid will pass by Earth at just above satellite altitude | Science

House-sized asteroid will pass by Earth at just above satellite altitude | Science

Tech
[ad_1] A house-size asteroid will give Earth a near-miss on Thursday, giving experts a rare chance to rehearse for a real-life strike threat as it passes inside the moon’s orbit. Dubbed 2012 TC4, the space rock will shave past at an altitude of less than 44,000km (27,300 miles) – just above the 36,000km plane at which hundreds of geosynchronous satellites orbit the Earth. That represents about an eighth of the distance between the Earth and the moon. Nasa’s Mike Kelley, who leads the exercise to spot, track and intimately probe the transient visitor, insisted there was “no danger. Not even for satellites”. “We’ve now been observing TC4 for two months, so we have very accurate position information on it, which in turn allows very precise calculations of its orbit,” which…
Read More
What is cryo-electron microscopy, the Nobel prize-winning technique? | Science

What is cryo-electron microscopy, the Nobel prize-winning technique? | Science

Tech
[ad_1] A trio of scientists share this year’s Nobel prize for chemistry: Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson. Their win is for work on a technique known as cryo-electron microscopy that has allowed scientists to study biological molecules in unprecedented sharpness, not least the Zika virus and proteins thought to be involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Being able to capture images of these biological molecules at atomic resolution not only helps scientists to understand their structures, but has opened up the possibility of exploring biological processes by stitching together images taken at different points in time. Experts add that the information gleaned through cryo-electron microscopy has proved valuable in helping scientists to develop drugs. “It has been used in visualising the way in which antibodies can work to stop viruses…
Read More
Antikythera shipwreck yields new treasures – and hints of priceless classical statues | Science

Antikythera shipwreck yields new treasures – and hints of priceless classical statues | Science

Tech
[ad_1] Marine archaeologists have recovered a bronze arm from an ancient shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera, where the remains of at least seven more priceless statues from the classical world are believed to lie buried. Divers found the right arm, encrusted and stained green, under half a metre of sediment on the boulder-strewn slope where the ship and its cargo now rest. The huge vessel, perhaps 50m from bow to stern, was sailing from Asia Minor to Rome in 1BC when it foundered near the tiny island between Crete and the Peloponnese. The project team, from the Greek Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, discovered the buried arm with a bespoke underwater metal detector which has revealed the presence of other large metal…
Read More
Rainer Weiss, Barry C Barish and Kip S Thorne win the 2017 Nobel prize in physics – live | Science

Rainer Weiss, Barry C Barish and Kip S Thorne win the 2017 Nobel prize in physics – live | Science

Tech
[ad_1] On 14 September 2015, the universe’s gravitational waves were observed for the very first time. The waves, which were predicted by Albert Einstein a hundred years ago, came from a collision between two black holes. It took 1.3bn years for the waves to arrive at the Ligo detector in the USA. The signal was extremely weak when it reached Earth, but is already promising a revolution in astrophysics. Gravitational waves are an entirely new way of observing the most violent events in space and testing the limits of our knowledge. Ligo, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, is a collaborative project with over one thousand researchers from more than twenty countries. Together, they have realised a vision that is almost fifty years old. The 2017 Nobel Laureates have, with their…
Read More